Digital Access

Digital Access
Access daily-chronicle.com from all your digital devices and receive breaking news and updates from around the area.

Home Delivery

Home Delivery
Local news, prep sports, Chicago sports, local and regional entertainment, business, home and lifestyle, food, classified and more!

Text Alerts

Text Alerts
Choose your news! Select the text alerts you want to receive: breaking news, prep sports scores, school closings, weather, and more.

Email Newsletters

Email Newsletters
We'll deliver news & updates to your inbox. Sign up for free e-newsletters today.
Health

Understanding your audiogram

SPONSORED

An audiogram is a graph that gives a detailed description of your hearing based on a series of tests performed by a hearing health professional. The graph shows the softest sounds a person can hear at different pitches, or frequencies. This will help to determine whether or not a person is suffering from hearing loss and how severe it may be. 

An audiogram has a vertical axis that represents sound volume, measured in decibels. Zero decibels (dB) are at the top, representing the softest sounds a person can hear. The horizontal axis shows sound frequency measured in Hertz (Hz).

The graph starts with the lowest frequency on the left and will gradually increase as you move to the right. An audiologist or licensed hearing aid dispenser tests at 125, 250, 500, 1,000, 2,000, 3,000, 4,000 and 8,000 Hz. The scores for the right ear are represented by red Os and the scores for the left ear are represented by blue Xs.

A person's degree of hearing loss is determined by their hearing threshold, which is the lowest sound that can be heard 50 percent of the time. The severity is the difference between the patient's threshold and the average threshold for people with normal hearing. (NationalHearingTest.org) Commonly, the results may differ in each ear.

Generally speaking, according to hear-it.org, the more markings below 25 dB or more, at the frequencies which are normally used in conversation (200-6,000 Hz), the more difficult it is to hear what is being said – especially in environments with background noise like a crowded restaurant.

Hearing Help Plus+  |  1.800.496.3202  |  www.HearingHelpPlus.com

1712 Sycamore Rd, DeKalb, IL 60115.