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Health

Cleaning your hearing aids

SPONSORED

If you’re an experienced hearing aid user, you’ve probably come to the realization that these small electronic devices have become an essential part of your life. You rely on them daily, and, as an investment, it’s important to maintain proper care and cleanings.

Clean your hearing aids in the morning, and once you take them out for the day, keep them in a cool, dry place with the battery compartment open to allow them to dry out and any soft wax to harden overnight, making cleaning much easier come morning.

An alcohol-free cleaning wipe or a soft cloth will keep the outer shell clean and dry, making it easier to handle. It can also prevent wax from slipping down inside.

A wax pick/loop and brush can be twisted in and out of the receiver in in-the-ear hearing aids to brush over hard-to-reach areas (microphone port, volume control, etc.) on any hearing aid style.

If you wear in-the-ear hearing aids hold the hearing aid upside down so the receiver hole is pointing towards the ground. If your hearing aid uses eartips or filters, which can easily become clogged, change them when needed.

If you wear behind-the-ear hearing aids be sure to remove the tubing and ear tip or custom fit earmold before cleaning – this piece needs to be cleaned separately. Molds and tubing can be washed with warm, soapy water, but must be completely dry before reattaching to your hearing aid to avoid internal moisture damage to electrical components.

Tubing should be clear and flexible. If hardened or yellowed, replace it.

Use a bulb blower to blow debris through tubing. Do not use your breath as it is filled with moisture. A thin cleaning “pin” can clean a slim-tube hearing aid.

If you wear receiver-in-canal hearing aids frequently check that the filter is clear to avoid costly replacement.

Hearing Help Plus+ | 1.800.496.3202 | www.HearingHelpPlus.com

1712 Sycamore Rd, DeKalb, IL 60115.